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Jewish Recipes --> Spices and Ingredients -- > Hot Sauces

Fresh Sriracha
A Thai/Asian "hot" sauce affectionately dubbed ‘Rooster’
Recipe adapted from FOOD52
Serves 1 1/2 cups
Recipe Ingredients:
  • 1/2 pound red fresno chiles, coarsely chopped - Do not seed the peppers...the seed is where the heat is
    4 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons palm sugar * (recipe calls for palm sugar, but brown sugar is more readily available most places, and the difference in flavor is almost indistinguishable)
1. Place all the ingredients except the sugar in a jar and let sit overnight to mellow the heat of the peppers. I guess one could consider this a brine.
2. Place the mixture and sugar in small saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, then lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside to cool to room temperature.
3. Transfer to a blender and puree for about 5 minutes, until a smooth, orange-red mixture forms. Run through a strainer and smush out as much juice as possible.
4. Once refrigerated, the sauce should have the same consistency and texture as the 'Rooster', but less salty and a whole lot fresher tasting!

This recipe can been frozen and although it separates upon thawing, shaking or stirring blends it and the taste is still good - however, the vinegar and chilis keep the sauce for months in the fridge (flavor will slightly diminish).

*Palm sugar is one of the new products on the "naturally sweet" market. With its light brown granules and caramel taste, palm sugar can be used in place of brown sugar in most any recipe.

Palm sugar was originally made from the sap of the Palmyra palm, the date palm or the sugar date palm. Now it is also made from the sap of the Arenga pinnata (sugar palm) and the nipa palm, and may therefore also be sold as "arenga sugar". Palm sugar is made by making several slits into the stem of a palm tree and collecting the sap. The sap is then boiled until it thickens.

Palm sugar should not be confused with coconut sugar, which is made from the sap of cut flower buds of the coconut palm, instead of from the sap of the tree itself.

In Thai cuisine, palm sugar is mainly used in sweets and desserts, but also in Thai curries and sauces.


Red Fresno peppers can be hard to find except for a brief window of time so the following make good substitutions (note - green or red peppers can be used - red peppers will impart more of a sweetness than will green):
  • medium sized red jalapenos
  • cherry bomb peppers
  • red serranos
  • red Thai chili peppers

The Fresno chili pepper is a medium-sized cultivar of Capsicum annuum. It is similar to the Jalapeño pepper, but contains thinner walls. The fruit starts out bright green changing to orange and red as fully matured. A mature Fresno pepper will be conical in shape, 2 inches long, and about 1 inch in diameter at the stem

Fresno peppers are frequently used for ceviche, salsa and as an accompaniment for rice and black beans. Due to their thin walls, they do not dry well and are not good for chili powder. In cooking, they can often be substituted for or with Jalapeño and Serrano peppers. Mild green ones can typically be purchased in the summer while the hot red ones are available in the fall. Depending on its maturity it has different culinary usages.

Immature green Fresno peppers are more versatile and can be added to many types of dishes. They add mild heat and flavor to sauces, chutneys, dips, relishes, casseroles, soups, stews and savory dishes. Green Fresnos can also be pickled and eaten whole. They make an excellent garnish for Mexican and Southwestern American cuisine.

Mature red Fresno peppers provide less flavor and more heat. They are often added to salsas, relishes, ceviches, and marinades. They make good toppings for tacos, tostadas, burgers, sausages and hot dogs. They are large enough to stuff with cheeses, potatoes, seafood and meat.

Hot Sauces -- Sauces

 

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods