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Jewish Recipes --> Spices and Ingredients --> List of Herbs

Are spices and herbs synonymous, or not?

The term spice is derived from the Latin "species aromatacea", meaning fruits of the earth and are defined as an "aromatic, pungent vegetable substance used to flower food".

Charlemagne defined herbs as "a friend of physicians and the praise of cooks". Herbs are defined as a "plant without woody tissue that withers and dies after flowering". The FDA considers spices and herbs as one and the same and categorically defines culinary spice and herbs as an aromatic vegetable that gives flavor and seasoning to food rather than nutritional value. Spice sources include bark, bulbs, buds, flowers, fruit leaves, roots, seeds and plant tops.

Halacha (Jewish law as pertains to kashrus) categorically classifies herbs and spices as products which are flavoring agents for food.

List of Herbs

  • Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum)
  • Angelica (Angelica archangelica)
  • Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)
  • Basils  (Ocimum basilicum)
  • Bergamot (Monarda didyma)
  • Bison grass(Hierochloe odorata)
  • Bolivian Coriander (Porophyllum ruderale)
  • Borage (Borago officinalis)
  • Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium)
  • Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)
  • Cicely (Myrrhis odorata)
  • Cilantro (see Coriander) (Coriandrum sativum)
  • Cress Damiana (Turnera aphrodisiaca, T. diffusa)
  • Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)
  • Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens) medicinal
  • Dill (Anethum graveolens)
  • Evening primrose (Oenothera biennis et al)
  • Epazote (Chenopodium ambrosioides)
  • Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)
  • Fenugreek
  • Herbes de Provence
  • Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)
  • Kaffir Lime Leaves (Citrus hystrix, C. papedia)
  • Lavender (Lavandula spp.)
  • Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus, C. flexuosus, and other species)
  • Lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora)
  • Lemon verbena (Lippia citriodora)
  • Lovage (Levisticum officinale)
  • Marjoram (Origanum majorana)
  • Mint (Mentha spp.)
  • Milk thistle (Silybum)
  • Mullien (Verbascum thapsus)
  • Mustard
  • Oregano (Origanum vulgare, O. heracleoticum, and other species)
  • Pandan leaf
  • Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)
  • Primrose (Primula) -- candied flowers, tea
  • Purslane
  • Rocket (Arugula)
  • Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)
  • Sage (Salvia officinalis)
  • Salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor or Poterium sanguisorba)
  • Savory (Satureja hortensis, S. montana)
  • Sweet cicely (Myrrhis odorata)
  • Sweet Woodruff
  • Tansy
  • Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus)
  • Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)
  • Vietnamese Coriander or Rau ram (Polygonum odoratum or Persicaria odorata)
  • Vitex or Chasteberry (Vitex agnus-castus)

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods