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Jewish Recipes --> Spices and Ingredients --> Basil

basil

Basil

Recipes:

Basil is commonly used fresh in cooked recipes. In general, it is added at the last moment, as cooking quickly destroys the flavor. The fresh herb can be kept for a short time in plastic bags in the refrigerator, or for a longer period in the freezer, after being blanched quickly in boiling water. The dried herb also loses most of its flavor, and what little flavor remains tastes very different, with a weak coumarin flavor, like hay.

Basil is one of the main ingredients in pesto—a green Italian oil-and-herb sauce. Its other main ingredients are olive oil, garlic, and pine nuts.

The most commonly used Mediterranean basil cultivars are "Genovese", "Purple Ruffles", "Mammoth", "Cinnamon", "Lemon", "Globe", and "African Blue". The Chinese also use fresh or dried basils in soups and other foods. In Taiwan, people add fresh basil leaves to thick soups (Chinese: 羹湯; pinyin: gēngtāng). They also eat fried chicken with deep-fried basil leaves. Basil (most commonly Thai basil) is commonly steeped in cream or milk to create an interesting flavor in ice cream or chocolates (such as truffles). The leaves are not the only part of basil used in culinary applications, the flower buds have a more subtle flavor and they are edible.

Thai basil is also a condiment in the Vietnamese noodle soup, phở.

Kosher Certification: OU

Dried basil leaves - Basil, fresh Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

  • Energy 94 kJ (22 kcal)
  • Carbohydrates 2.65 g
    - Dietary fiber 1.6 g
  • Fat 0.64 g Protein 3.15 g Water 92.06 g Vitamin A equiv. 264 μg (33%)
    - beta-carotene 3142 μg (29%)
    Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.034 mg (3%) Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.076 mg (6%) Niacin (vit. B3) 0.902 mg (6%) Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.209 mg (4%) Vitamin B6 0.155 mg (12%)
  • Folate (vit. B9) 68 μg (17%)
  • Choline 11.4 mg (2%)
  • Vitamin C 18.0 mg (22%)
  • Vitamin E 0.80 mg (5%)
  • Vitamin K 414.8 μg (395%)
  • Calcium 177 mg (18%)
  • Iron 3.17 mg (24%)
  • Magnesium 64 mg (18%)
  • Manganese 1.148 mg (55%)
  • Phosphorus 56 mg (8%)
  • Potassium 295 mg (6%)
  • Sodium 4 mg (0%)
  • Zinc 0.81 mg (9%)
Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Jewish Recipes