Jewish Recipes
Jewish Recipes

Home | Jewish Recipes Main Directory | Submit a Recipe | Kosher Dieting | What Blessing do I make over foods? | About Us
Kosher Grocery Store | Kitchenware | Judaica | Jewish Cookbooks | Food and Health | Search Recipes

Jewish Recipes

Jewish Recipes
Kosher Recipes
  Cooking Terms
  Jewish Cookbooks
Jewish Foods
Kosher Spices
Ingredients
Dairy
Meat
  Parve
  Baba Ganoush
  Bagels
Blintz
Challah
  Charoset
  Cholent
  Etrog
  Farfel
  Falafel
Fish
  Gefilte Fish
  Hamantaschen
  Hummus
  Jewish Holidays
  Knish
  Kosher Recipes
  Kosher Wines
  Kugel
  Latkes
  Lox (salmon)
  Matzah
  Pita
  Spices and Ingredients
  Sufganiya
  Tzimmes

Jewish Cooking

  Judaica
Kitchenware
Kosher Symbols
What is Kosher ?
What is a hechsher?

Page Options

Send

Jewish Recipes: Copyright - Disclaimer

Add us to your favorites

|

Jewish Recipes --> Spices and Ingredients -- > Anise

Anise (stressed on the first syllable, rhyming with "Janice"), or more rarely anís (stressed on the second syllable, as "a niece") (Pimpinella anisum) is an herb in the family Apiaceae (formerly Umbelliferae) whose seed-like fruit (also called aniseed) is used in sweet baking as well as in anise-flavored liqueurs (e.g. Ouzo). The fruit consists of two united carpels, called a cremocarp, and has a strong aromatic taste and a powerful odour. Anise seed is also used in some curries and seafood dishes, and is used as a breath sweetener and digestive aid. It is also used to make Aniseed Balls, a hard UK sweet.

All above-ground parts of the young anise plant are also eaten as a vegetable. The stems resemble those of celery in texture and are much milder in flavor than the fruits. Anise is believed to be a galactagogue, or a substance that increases lactation.

By distillation the fruit yields the volatile oil of anise, which is useful in the treatment of flatulence and colic in children. It may be given as Aqua Anisi, in doses of one or more ounces, or as the Spiritus Anisi, in doses of 5-20 minims.

The primary constituent of the oil (up to 90%) is anethole, C10H12O or C6H4[1.4](OCH3)(CH:CH.CH3.) It also contains methyl chavicol, anisic aldehyde, anisic acid, and a terpene.

The Chinese star anise also contains anethole but is botanically unrelated to anise. Because of its similar taste and aroma, it has recently come into use in the West as a (cheaper) substitute for anise in baking as well as in liquor production.

Anisette

Anisette is an anise-flavored liqueur from France. It is sweeter than most anise-flavored liqueurs (such as pastis), and also has a lower alcohol content (typically 25% by volume, versus 40%). Marie Brizard is the most well-known brand of anisette.

Anisette Liqueur Recipe

Anisette, is very easy to make. It resembles the flavor of black licorice and is quit good in mixed drinks.

  • 15.7 oz. (466 ml.) 100° proof Vodka (non-flavored)
  • 7 drops anise oil
  • 9.6 oz. (284 ml.) simple syrup
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml.) glycerin (optional)

Add alcohol to the bottle in which the anisette will be stored; add anise oil and shake vigorously until all oil is dissolved (1 min.) Add the rest of the ingredients and again shake well.

Presto—it's ready to drink!

30% Alc. by Vol. (60°). Makes 750 ml.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods