Jewish Recipes
Jewish Recipes

Home | Jewish Recipes Main Directory | Submit a Recipe | Kosher Dieting | What Blessing do I make over foods? | About Us
Kosher Grocery Store | Kitchenware | Judaica | Jewish Cookbooks | Food and Health | Search Recipes

Jewish Recipes

Jewish Recipes
Kosher Recipes
  Cooking Terms
  Jewish Cookbooks
Jewish Foods
Kosher Spices
Ingredients
Dairy
Meat
  Parve
  Baba Ganoush
  Bagels
Blintz
Challah
  Charoset
  Cholent
  Etrog
  Farfel
  Falafel
Fish
  Gefilte Fish
  Hamantaschen
  Hummus
  Jewish Holidays
  Knish
  Kosher Recipes
  Kosher Wines
  Kugel
  Latkes
  Lox (salmon)
  Matzah
  Pita
  Spices and Ingredients
  Sufganiya
  Tzimmes

Jewish Cooking

  Judaica
Kitchenware
Kosher Symbols
What is Kosher ?
What is a hechsher?

Page Options

Send

Jewish Recipes: Copyright - Disclaimer

Add us to your favorites

|

Jewish Recipes --> Kosher Symbols  --> of United States

For informational purposes only - Consult your Rabbi on Kosher Issues

Jewish Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking  Click here for the Kosher Symbols - The Hebrew word kosher means fit or proper as it relates to dietary (kosher) laws. It means that a given product is permitted and acceptable.  The sources for the laws of kashruth are of Biblical origin and expounded in Rabbinic legislation, through which the Rabbis interpreted, or added preventative measures to the Biblical regulations. These laws are codified in the Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law), and are discussed in the ancient, medieval, and contemporary writings of the Rabbis. The laws of kashruth are complex and extensive. The intention of this guide is to acquaint the reader with some of the fundamentals of kashruth and provide an insight into their practical application. Given the complex nature of the laws of kashruth, one should consult an Orthodox Rabbi when a question involving kashruth arises. Though an ancillary hygienic benefit has been attributed to the observance of kashruth, their ultimate purpose and rationale is simply to conform to the Divine Will as expressed in the Torah.

D: Dairy
DE: The product has no dairy ingredients, but has been prepared on Dairy Equipment; because of this it may be eaten immediately after a meat meal but not together with a meat meal.
P: Passover Kosher for all year including Passover (Note: "P" NEVER designates pareve )
Pareve: Non dairy
Cholov Yisroel: Milk and Dairy products which have been produced under the supervision of a Jew.
[Kosher supervised milk used in ingredients]
Pas Yisroel: Literally 'Bread of an Israelite,' meaning bread or grain products cooked or baked with participation by an observant Jew."
[Jewish baked foods]
Yoshon: Grain products from grain which took root before the second day of Passover, when the Omer, or barley offering, is given."
[Not from current grain crop]
Kosher Glatt: Literally, 'Glatt' is Yiddish for 'smooth.' It refers to meat from an adult, large-herd (steer, heifers, bulls, cow, buffalo) kosher slaughtered animal whose lungs were found to be free of any adhesions," hence 'smooth.'

Jewish Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking  Click here for the Kosher Symbols - The Hebrew word kosher means fit or proper as it relates to dietary (kosher) laws. It means that a given product is permitted and acceptable.  The sources for the laws of kashruth are of Biblical origin and expounded in Rabbinic legislation, through which the Rabbis interpreted, or added preventative measures to the Biblical regulations. These laws are codified in the Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law), and are discussed in the ancient, medieval, and contemporary writings of the Rabbis. The laws of kashruth are complex and extensive. The intention of this guide is to acquaint the reader with some of the fundamentals of kashruth and provide an insight into their practical application. Given the complex nature of the laws of kashruth, one should consult an Orthodox Rabbi when a question involving kashruth arises. Though an ancillary hygienic benefit has been attributed to the observance of kashruth, their ultimate purpose and rationale is simply to conform to the Divine Will as expressed in the Torah.

Rabbi Yidel Gruber, 148 Penn Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211. (718) 797-1429

Academy of Kosher Supervision (Vaad Mishmeres HaKashrus)

Vaad Harabanim - Rabbinical Council of Bergen County ("RCBC")

Rabbi Yidel Gruber,
148 Penn Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211. (718) 797-1429

Academy of Kosher Supervision (Vaad Mishmeres HaKashrus), 876 E. 14 Street, Brooklyn, NY 11230. (718) 258-6640; Rabbi Yochanan Davis. Vaad Harabanim - Rabbinical Council of Bergen County ("RCBC")
 
PO Box 1233, Teaneck, NJ 07666. (201) 287-9292
 Rabbi Meir Brueckheimer, Executive Director;
Rabbi Michael Taubes, President; Rabbi Binyomin Taub, Kashrus Coordinator

Vaad Hakashrus of Denver

   

Vaad Hakashrus of
Denver

1350 Vrain St
Denver, CO 80204
(303) 595 9349

Canada
For informational purposes only - Consult your Rabbi

Kashruth Council
Orthodox Division Toronto
Jewish Congress,
4600 Bathhurst Street,
Willowdale, Ontario M2R 3V2;
(416) 635 9550 Rabbi M. Levin, Executive Director.
Montreal Vaad Hair
5491 Victoria Avenue, Montreal, Canada H3W 2PN;
(514) 739 6363
FAX: (514) 739 7024
Rabbi Niznik, Kashrus Director,
Rabbi Mordechai Tober, Kashrus Supervisor.
Vancouver Kashruth
3476 Oak Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6H 2L8;
(604) 736 7607;
Rabbi Mordechai Fuerstein,
Rabbinic Administrator.

France

   
Rav Y.D. Frankfurter,
Adath Yereim of Paris
10 Rue Cadet, 9e (Metro Cadet);
Tel. 42.46.36.47
Rav Chaim Yaakov Rottenberg
Chief Orthodoxe Rav of Paris (Grand Rabbin)
8 Rue Pavee, Paris 4;Tel. 48.87.49.03
blank

Israel

Glatt Kosher Nevei Achiezer
Shikun 6, Bnai Brak;
Rav Shlomo Mahpud,
(03) 769 702,
Rav Baruch Roshgold,
(03) 797 172.
Harabanut Harashit
58 King George Street,
Jerusalem, P.O.B. 7525,
Tel. 247112
The Beth Din Zedek of Agudath Israel,
Moetzes Hakashrus,2 Press St., Jerusalem,POB 513;
Tel: 02 38525104

blank
The Bais Din Tzedek of the Eida Hachareidis of Jerusalem
Binyanei Zupnick 26A, Rechov Strauss, Jerusalem;
Tel. 02 251651 /231084 FAX: 02 254975. TELEFAX: 972 2 25497S
The Bais Din Tzedek of K'hal Machzikei Hadas
4 Sholel St., Jerusalem, Tel. 02 385832
4 Belza St., B'nai B'rak,
Tel.795414 FAX: 02 373884

United Kingdom

Kedassia, The Joint Kashrus Committee of England court of the chief Rabbi Beth Din London Manchester Beth Din
 
Kedassia, The Joint Kashrus Committee of England
67 Amhurst Park,
London, England.
Court of the Chief Rabbi
Beth Din, London
Kashrut Division
Rabbi J.D. Conway, Director
Court of the Chief Rabbi
735 High Road London
N12 0US phone: (44) 0181 343 6255
fax: (44) 0181-3436254
email: info@kosher.org.uk
www.kosher.org.uk
Manchester Beth Din
435 Cheetam Hill Road, Manchester,8, England;
Tel. 061 740 9711
Dayan O. Westheim, Rabbinic Administrator.

Kosher Symbols

1

2

 

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods