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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Vegetable Dishes  --> Potato Recipes --> Yams

Kosher Yam Recipes

Yam is the common name for some species in the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae). These are perennial herbaceous vines cultivated for the consumption of their starchy tubers in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Oceania. There are many of cultivars of yam.

The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) has traditionally been referred to as a "yam" in parts of the southern United States and Canada, but it is not part of the Dioscoreaceae family.

Although it is unclear which came first, the word yam is related to Portuguese inhame or Spanish ņame, which both ultimately derive from the Wolof word nyam, meaning "to sample" or "taste"; in other African languages it can also mean "to eat", e.g. yamyam and nyama in Hausa.

A Nigerian word for yam is adamwanga, meaning "Adamo's food". Adamo was a chief notorious for his ability to consume incredible amounts of food, and was even banned from a neighboring village for his refusal to stop.

Yam tubers can grow up to 2.5 meters in length and weigh up to 70 kg (150 pounds).

The vegetable has a rough skin which is difficult to peel, but which softens after heating. The skins vary in color from dark brown to light pink.

The majority of the vegetable is composed of a much softer substance known as the "meat". This substance ranges in color from white or yellow to purple or pink in ripe yams.

Yams are a primary agricultural commodity in West Africa and New Guinea. They were first cultivated in Africa and Asia about 8000 B.C. Due to their abundance and consequently, their importance to survival, the yam was highly regarded in Nigerian ceremonial culture and even worshiped.

Yams are still important for survival in these regions. The tubers can be stored up to six months without refrigeration, which makes them a valuable resource for the yearly period of food scarcity at the beginning of the wet season.

Yams are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Palpifer sordida.

 

 
Cooking Tips:   Higher humilities, at which most other vegetables keep best in storage, may cause onions to grow roots, rot, and develop surface mold. Excessive drying, however, may result in cracking or loss (bald onions) of the outer bulb scales.

 

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods