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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Soups

Pumpkin Soup
Recipe Ingredients::
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter or olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 cups cubed fresh pumpkin or squash, peeled and cut into 2 inch chunks
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon Zip
  • 1/2 teaspoon good quality dry mustard
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (or less, if the stock you are using is salty)
  • 2 cups good quality turkey or chicken broth, or vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or sugar
Combine butter, onion, pumpkin, and garlic in microwaveable pot. Microwave on high for 5 minutes, covered. Microwave another 3-4 min., or until the pumpkin is tender. Cover and let stand 5-8 minutes.

Then puree in the food processor, with a little water if necessary to make it whirl and puree. Put it back into the pot and add the Zip, mustard, flour, salt, and stock. Microwave on high for 3 minutes. Stir. Microwave another 5-7 minutes on high, then on half power for 10 minutes to blend flavors. Taste and add the syrup or sugar.


Parve or meat depending on broth used

 

Soups -- Squash

Cooking Tips:   pumpkin

When the Colonists landed in North America they found the Indians growing and using pumpkins. This large, ungainly fruit was enthusiastically embraced by the new Americans and subsequently pumpkin pie became a national Thanksgiving tradition. It was so loved that one early Connecticut colony delayed Thanksgiving because the molasses needed to make this popular pie wasn't readily available. Large, round and orange, the pumpkin is a member of the gourd family, which also includes muskmelon, watermelon and squash. Its orange flesh has a mild, sweet flavor and the seeds-husked and roasted-are delicately nutty. Pumpkin seeds are commonly known as pepitas.

Fresh pumpkins are available in the fall and winter and some specimens have weighed in at well over 100 pounds. In general, however, the flesh from smaller sizes will be more tender and succulent. Choose pumpkins that are free from blemishes and heavy for their size. Store whole pumpkins at room temperature up to a month or refrigerate up to 3 months. Puréed pumpkin is also available canned. Pumpkin may be prepared in almost any way suitable for winter squash. It's a good source of vitamin A.

 

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods