Jewish Recipes
Jewish Recipes

Home | Jewish Recipes Main Directory | Submit a Recipe | Kosher Dieting | What Blessing do I make over foods? | About Us
Kosher Grocery Store | Kitchenware | Judaica | Jewish Cookbooks | Food and Health | Search Recipes

Jewish Recipes

Jewish Recipes
Kosher Recipes
  Cooking Terms
  Jewish Cookbooks
Jewish Foods
Kosher Spices
Ingredients
Dairy
Meat
  Parve
  Baba Ganoush
  Bagels
Blintz
Challah
  Charoset
  Cholent
  Etrog
  Farfel
Falafel
Fish
Gefilte Fish
  Hamantaschen
  Hummus
  Jewish Holidays
  Knish
  Kosher Recipes
  Kosher Wines
  Kugel
  Latkes
  Lox (salmon)
  Matzah
  Pita
  Spices and Ingredients
  Sufganiya
  Tzimmes

Jewish Cooking

  Judaica
Kitchenware
Kosher Symbols
What is Kosher ?
What is a hechsher?

Page Options

Send

Jewish Recipes: Copyright - Disclaimer

Add us to your favorites

|

Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Purim

Macrute
Recipe Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. semolina
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 6 to 7 oz. dates
  • 1 pinch nutmeg
  • Cinnamon, ground cloves and ground ginger
  • 1 cup oil
  • Honey
 

Mix semolina with sugar and hot oil, knead well and open half of the dough with a pin over a table (preferably marble).

Pit the dates and grind together with the spices. Fry in oil for 3 minutes.

Cover the semolina dough with the date paste, leaving the borders free and cover with the other half of the dough.

Cut in slices and put in a medium heat oven (350 degrees) in a baking pan dusted with flour. When they are golden brown, cover with honey and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Simone Greenbaum says: My father always made these for Purim back when I was growing up in Tunisia.

Then, when we came to this country and we started to be educated about fried foods, he started to bake them in an oven at 350F for about 1/2 hour. Also, since we could not find semolina with a hechsher, he started to use a mixture of farina and cream of wheat. Tasted all the same.

He also made his own syrup to engulf them in by cooking 1 part sugar to 2 parts water with juice of 1 lemon and cooking until it had the consistency of corn syrup.

By the way the French Jews in Paris call them macroud.

Posted by Liliana Wajnberg

Parve -- Purim -- Dessert -- Cookies

Cooking Tips:  

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods