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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Meat --> Beef --> Brisket

Beef Brisket

Brisket is a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest of beef or veal. The beef brisket is one of the nine beef primal cuts. The brisket muscles include the superficial and deep pectorals. As cattle do not have collar bones, these muscles support about 60% of the body weight of standing/moving cattle. This requires a significant amount of connective tissue, so the resulting meat must be cooked correctly to tenderize the connective tissue.

Brisket can be cooked many ways. Basting of the meat is often done during the cooking process. This normally tough cut of meat, due to the collagen fibers that make up the significant connective tissue in the cut, is tenderized when the collagen gelatinizes, resulting in more tender brisket. The fat cap often left attached to the brisket helps to keep the meat from drying during the prolonged cooking necessary to break down the connective tissue in the meat. Water is necessary for the conversion of collagen to gelatin.

In traditional Jewish cooking, brisket is most often braised as a pot roast, especially as a holiday main course, usually served at Rosh Hashanah, Passover, and Shabbot. For reasons of economics and kashrut, it was historically one of the more popular cuts of beef among Ashkenazi Jews. Brisket is also the most popular cut for corned beef, which can be further spiced and smoked to make pastrami.

The Life-Transforming Diet based on Health and Psychological Principles of
Maimonides and other Classical Sources

from Chapter 3, Practically Speaking

(p. 41) . . .what is different about the Life-Transforming Diet?. . .[it is] based on the principles of Rambam. . .[and it] can be realistically sustained. We restrict neither food quantities nor any type of nutritious foods. We propose eating principles. You can choose which nutritious foods to eat when implementing these positive eating habits.
. . .If you follow the principles then you do not have to weigh, count or restrict your food.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods