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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Jewish Holidays --> Shabbat

Shabbat Carrot-Apple Kugel (p. 146)
From The Hadassah Jewish Holiday Cookbook -Traditional Recipes from Contemporary Kosher Kitchens
Ingredients:
  • 8 carrots, peeled and grated
  • 3 apples, peeled, cored, and grated
  • 1 C. dried cherries
  • 1/2 C. pistachio nuts
  • 1/4 C. grated orange zest
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 C. matza cake meal
  • 1/2 C. oil
  • 1/4 C. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 t. ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 t. ground ginger
  • 1/2 t. ground allspice


The Hadassah Jewish Holiday Cookbook

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Grease two 8 x 4 inch loaf pans.
2.Combine all ingredients and divide evenly between the pans. Cover
tightly with foil and bake 20 minutes, then reduce heat to lowest and bake overnight, or at least 8 hours.

Serves 10-12
 
 

Apples -- Carrot -- Shabbat

  • This recipe calls for eggs, so remember-according to laws of kashrut, which are also spiritual-to first check them for blood by breaking them into a plain clear-glass cup or dish (a ramekin is fine for this); look at them from the top, and then lift the glass and look underneath, to make certain their are no blood spots. If there are, the egg needs to be discarded.

 

  • Can you just imagine the aroma of this sweet-and-spicy casserole wafting through the house on Shabbat? This dish could be the personification of the heavenly "besamim," or spices with which we describe Shabbat, with its 'extra neshama,' or soul; that is why we end Shabbat by smelling besamim in the Havdalah ceremony: we say a wistful, sad 'goodbye' to our extra neshama which leaves us at the close of Shabbat. But, no fear-that extra soul-symbolized by the spiritual scent of the besamim-will return next week, at the start of Shabbat. . .

Cooking Tips:  

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods