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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Kosher Meat --> Smoked Meats --> Pastrami

Pastrami [Yiddish pastrame] A highly seasoned smoked cut of beef, usually taken from the shoulder.

Popular deli meat made from chiefly red meat. The raw meat is salted (through immersion in a thick brine), then dried, seasoned with various herbs and spices (such as garlic, black pepper, marjoram, basil) and smoked. Aside from the pepper and smoking, it is similar in process and flavor to corned beef. In the United Kingdom and the United States, beef is used and the meat is boiled after the salting stage.

Pastrami is a popular delicatessen meat made principally from red meat, chiefly brisket. The raw meat is brined, partly dried, seasoned with various herbs and spices, then smoked.

Both the dish and the word pastrami were brought to the United States in a wave of Jewish immigration from Bessarabia and Romania in the second half of the 19th century. The word, derived from the Yiddish: פפּאַסטראָמע (pronounced pastróme), entered the Russian language as pastromá (пастрома) via the Romanian pastramă, and it is likely rooted in the Turkish pastırma. [1] This in turn likely originated from a dish known as basterma in Arab cuisine and basturma in Armenian cuisine.

Early references in English used the spelling "pastrama", while its current form is associated with a Jewish store selling "pastrami" in New York City in 1887. It is likely that this spelling was introduced to sound related to the Italian salami.[2]

[1]  Dicţionarul explicativ al limbii române, Entry for Pastramă
[2]  Harry G. Levine, "Pastrami Land, the Jewish Deli in New York City", Contexts, Summer 2007

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods