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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Meat --> Kosher Glatt Meat

Kosher Glatt Meat

For meat to be kosher, you must start at the very beginning. You must ensure that only healthy animals are slaughtered for use in kosher foods. These animals must have split hooves and chew their cud. Cattle and sheep are the primary animals used in the koshering process. In the USA, only the front quarters of the animal are used for koshering.

Also see:

Jewish Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking  Click here for the Kosher Symbols - The Hebrew word kosher means fit or proper as it relates to dietary (kosher) laws. It means that a given product is permitted and acceptable.  The sources for the laws of kashruth are of Biblical origin and expounded in Rabbinic legislation, through which the Rabbis interpreted, or added preventative measures to the Biblical regulations. These laws are codified in the Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law), and are discussed in the ancient, medieval, and contemporary writings of the Rabbis. The laws of kashruth are complex and extensive. The intention of this guide is to acquaint the reader with some of the fundamentals of kashruth and provide an insight into their practical application. Given the complex nature of the laws of kashruth, one should consult an Orthodox Rabbi when a question involving kashruth arises. Though an ancillary hygienic benefit has been attributed to the observance of kashruth, their ultimate purpose and rationale is simply to conform to the Divine Will as expressed in the Torah.If you see any of the symbols that are represented, it means "the food has been inspected by one of the many kosher certifying agencies in the United States. Each agency identifies itself by its own unique symbol."

  • Pastrami [Yiddish pastrame] A highly seasoned smoked cut of beef, usually taken from the shoulder.

Hogs and pigs do not chew their cuds and are therefore not Kosher.

A kosher inspection starts while the animals are still alive and continues until the finished product leaves the plant. This system operates under the diligent and watchful supervision of kosher inspectors, who stringently control the process from the time the meat is slaughtered until it is shipped.

Kosher Slaughter (Shechitah)

This is where additional costs come in. The slaughter is performed by a "shochet"
(a man of skill, piety and expertise). Make sure that:

1. Neck area is clean
2. Severing of the trachea and esophagus
3. Cut is within the proper area
4. No hesitation
5. No pressing
6. No tearing

Meat Directory:

List of Kosher Meat and Poultry
Safe Minimum Cooking Temperatures
Beef
Bison
Chicken
Cornish Hens
Duck
Deer
Goat
Goose
Giraffe
Lamb
Turkey
Veal
Different Cuts of Beef
Kosher Glatt Meat?

Meat Featuring

Brisket

Chopped Liver

Corned Beef

Kishke

Meatballs

Meat Cholent

Pastrami

Poultry

 

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods