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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Desserts  -->  Fruits  --> Figs

Fig Confit (P) (p. 194)
Makes about 3 Cups
Recipe Ingredients:

Make Ahead/Storage: The figs can be stored in the refrigerator, covered, p to 2 weeks, or frozen for 3 months.

  • 4 C. sugar
  • 2 C. water
  • Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 cinnamon stick, about 2 inches long
  • 1/2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
  • 2 1/2 to 3 lbs. green or black figs, stemmed

Jewish Cooking for all Seasons
Fresh, Flavorful Kosher Recipes for Holidays and Ever Day
a) Place the sugar, water, lemon juice and zest, and cinnamon in a medium saucepan, and scrape in the seeds from the vanilla bean half (save the pod for another use). Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring. Add the figs and reduce the heat to a slow simmer.

b) Gently poach the figs for 2 hours, until the poaching liquid has reduced and the figs are thick and similar to marmalade. Transfer the figs with a slotted spoon to a 1-quart container. Reserve the poaching liquid separately for vinaigrettes, wine reductions, or topping frozen desserts.
 
 
Cooking Tips: Confit (French) (pronounced "Con-fee") is a generic term for various kinds of food that have been immersed in a substance for both flavor and preservation. Sealed and stored in a cool place, confit can last for several months. Confit is one of the oldest ways to preserve food, and is a speciality of southwestern France.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods