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Jewish Recipes --> Recipes --> Kosher Recipes --> Jams, Jellies & Spread

Jam is a condiment. It is made from fruit usually, by adding sugar, and sometimes pectin. Most jams are cooked.

Usually a jam contains as much sugar as it contains fruit. The two parts are then cooked together.

In the European Union, there is the jam directive (Council Directive 79/693/EEC, 24 July 1979). It sets minimum standards for the amount of "fruit" in jam, but the definition of fruit was expanded. This was done to take several unusual kinds of jam made in the EU into account. For this purpose, "fruit" is considered to include fruits that are not usually treated as fruits, such as tomatoes; fruits that are not normally made into jams, such as melons and watermelons; and vegetables that are sometimes made into jams, such as: rhubarb (the edible part of the stalks), carrots, sweet potatoes, cucumbers, and pumpkins.

 

 
 

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods