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Jewish Recipes --> Kosher Grocery Store --> Kosher Food

Raisin varieties depend on the type of grape used, and are made in a variety of sizes and colors including green, black, blue, purple and yellow. Seedless varieties include the sultana (also known as Thompson Seedless in the USA) and Flame grapes. Raisins are traditionally sun-dried, but may also be water-dipped and artificially dehydrated.

Kosher Certification: OU Passover

"Golden raisins" (called "sultanas" outside the US) are made from the sultana grape, treated with sulfur dioxide to maintain their golden color, and dried either on the vine or on special drying racks.

Recipes:

Black Corinth or Zante currant are miniature raisins that are much darker in color and have a tart, tangy flavor. They are often called currants.

Several varieties of raisins produced in Asia are available in the West only at ethnic grocers. Monukka grapes are used for some of these.

Nutrition Raisins, seedless Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

  • Energy 1,252 kJ (299 kcal)
  • Carbohydrates 79.18 g
    - Sugars 59.19 g
    - Dietary fiber 3.7 g
  • Fat 0.46 g
  • Protein 3.07 g
  • Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.106 mg (9%)
  • Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.125 mg (10%)
  • Niacin (vit. B3) 0.766 mg (5%)
  • Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.095 mg (2%)
  • Vitamin B6 0.174 mg (13%)
  • Folate (vit. B9) 5 μg (1%)
  • Choline 11.1 mg (2%)
  • Vitamin C 2.3 mg (3%)
  • Vitamin E 0.12 mg (1%)
  • Vitamin K 3.5 μg (3%)
  • Calcium 50 mg (5%)
  • Iron 1.88 mg (14%)
  • Magnesium 32 mg (9%)
  • Manganese 0.299 mg (14%)
  • Phosphorus 101 mg (14%)
  • Potassium 749 mg (16%)
  • Sodium 11 mg (1%)
  • Zinc 0.22 mg (2%)
  • Fluoride 233.9 g

USDA Database entry Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Raisins can contain up to 72% sugars by weight,[4] most of which is fructose and glucose. They also contain about 3% protein and 3.7%-6.8% dietary fiber.[5] Raisins, like prunes and apricots, are also high in certain antioxidants, but have a lower vitamin C content than fresh grapes. Raisins are low in sodium and contain no cholesterol.[6]

Data presented at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session in 2012 suggests that, among individuals with mild increases in blood pressure, the routine consumption of raisins (three times a day) may significantly lower blood pressure, especially when compared to eating other common snacks.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods