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Jewish Recipes --> Kosher Grocery Store --> Kosher Food

Horseradish

Recipe:

Kosher Certification: OU Passover

Culinary uses

Allyl isothiocyanate is the pungent ingredient in fresh horseradish sauce.

Cooks use the terms "horseradish" or "prepared horseradish" to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It will keep for months refrigerated but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavor and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as "horseradish greens", which have a flavor of root.

Horseradish sauce

Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland. In the UK it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast, but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: "his wit's as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard" in Henry IV Part II). A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.

In the U.S., the term "horseradish sauce" refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread.

The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 C. Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.

Nutrition Facts Horseradish

  • Amount Per 1 tbsp (15 g)
  • Calories 7

% Daily Value*

  • Total fat 0.1 g 0%
  • Saturated fat 0 g 0%
  • Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
  • Monounsaturated fat 0 g
  • Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
  • Sodium 63 mg 2%
  • Potassium 37 mg 1%
  • Total Carbohydrate 1.7 g 0%
  • Dietary fiber 0.5 g 2%
  • Sugar 1.2 g
  • Protein 0.2 g 0%
  • Vitamin A 0%
  • Vitamin C 6%
  • Calcium 0%
  • Iron 0%
  • Vitamin B-6 0%
  • Vitamin B-12 0%
  • Magnesium 1%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

     
     

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods