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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Soy Sauce

Soy sauce (also called soya sauce) is a condiment made from a fermented paste of boiled soybeans, roasted grain, brine, and Aspergillus oryzae or Aspergillus sojae molds. After fermentation, the paste is pressed, producing a liquid, which is the soy sauce, and a solid byproduct, which is often used as animal feed. Soy sauce is a traditional ingredient in East and Southeast Asian cuisines, where it is used in cooking and as a condiment. It originated in China in the 2nd century BCE and spread throughout Asia. Today, it is used in Western cuisine and prepared foods.

Soy Sauce Recipes:

Soy sauce has a distinct basic taste called umami (旨味?, "pleasant savory taste") in Japanese, due to naturally occurring free glutamates. Umami was identified as a basic taste in 1908 by Kikunae Ikeda of the Tokyo Imperial University.

Most varieties of soy sauce are salty, earthy, brownish liquids intended to season food while cooking or at the table,. Many kinds of soy sauce are made in China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Vietnam, Burma and other countries. Variation is usually achieved as the result of different methods and durations of fermentation, different ratios of water, salt, and fermented soy, or through the addition of other ingredients.
Contents

History

Soy sauce originated in China sometime between the 3rd and 5th century from an older meat-based fermented sauce named jiang. Its use later spread to East and Southeast Asia. Like many salty condiments, soy sauce was probably originally a way to stretch salt, historically an expensive commodity. In ancient China, fermented fish with salt was used as a condiment in which soybeans were included during the fermentation process. Eventually, this was replaced and the recipe for soy sauce, jiangyou (酱油), using soybeans as principal ingredient, with fermented fish-based sauces developing separately into fish sauce.

Records of the Dutch East India Company list soy sauce as a commodity in 1737, when seventy-five large barrels were shipped from Dejima, Japan, to Batavia (present-day Jakarta) on the island of Java. Thirty-five barrels from that shipment were then shipped to the Netherlands. In the 18th century, Isaac Titsingh published accounts of brewing soy sauce. Although earlier descriptions of soy sauce had been disseminated in the West, this was among the earliest to focus specifically on the brewing of the Japanese version. By the mid-19th century, the Japanese soy sauce gradually disappeared from the European market, and soy sauce became synonymous with the Chinese product. Europeans were unable to make soy sauce because they did not understand the function of Aspergillus oryzae, the fungus used in its brewing.

One 19th century writer wrote that in China, the best soy sauce is "made by boiling beans soft, adding an equal quantity of wheat or barley, and leaving the mass to ferment; a portion of salt and three times as much water are afterwards put in, and the whole compound left for two or three months when the liquid is pressed and strained".

Tamari Soy Sauce, Wheat Free, Organic, 10 oz

Made with 100% whole soybeans and no wheat, San-J Organic Tamari Gluten Free Soy Sauce has a richer and milder taste than regular soy sauce. Only our natural fermentation process can give San-J Tamari a rich, delectable flavor that enhances any type of cuisine. Perfect for stir-fry, marinade, and as a dipping sauce. Great to add to soups, sauces and casseroles. Certified Organic by USDA Organic and Quality Assurance International (QAI).

NUTRITION FACTS

Ingredients: Water, Organic Soybeans, Salt, Organic Alcohol (to preserve freshness)
Allergens: This product contains soy ingredients.
Certified Kosher by OU
Certified Organic by QAI and USDA Organic
Certified Gluten Free by the Gluten-Free Certification Organization Certified Vegan by Vegan Action
Non-GMO Project Verified

Serving Size: 1 Tbsp. (18g)
Servings Per Container: 20 per 10oz./UPC # 075810-001257
40 per 20oz./UPC # 075810-001356
Calories: 10
Calories From Fat: 0
Total Fat: 0g
Saturated Fat: 0g
Trans Fat: 0g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 940mg
Total Carb: <1g
Dietary Fiber: 0g
Sugars: 0g
Protein: 2g
Vitamin A: 0%
Vitamin C: 0%
Calcium: 0%
Iron: 4%

Always refer to package label for most accurate ingredient information.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods - Kosher Recipes