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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Nuts --> Pecan

A pecan, like the fruit of all other members of the hickory genus, is not truly a nut, but is technically a drupe, a fruit with a single stone or pit, surrounded by a husk. The husks are produced from the exocarp tissue of the flower, while the part known as the nut develops from the endocarp and contains the seed. The husk itself is aeneous, oval to oblong, 2.66 cm (1.02.4 in) long and 1.53 cm (0.591.2 in) broad. The outer husk is 34 mm (0.120.16 in) thick, starts out green and turns brown at maturity, at which time it splits off in four sections to release the thin-shelled nut.

Historically, the leading pecan-producing state in the U.S. has been Georgia, followed by Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma; they are also grown in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Arizona, South Carolina and Hawaii. Outside the United States, pecans are grown in Australia, Brazil, China, Israel, Mexico, Peru and South Africa. They can be grown approximately from USDA hardiness zones 5 to 9, provided summers are also hot and humid.

Pecans Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 2,889 kJ (690 kcal)

  • Carbohydrates 13.86
    - Starch 0.46
    - Sugars 3.97
    - Dietary fiber 9.6
  • Fat 71.97
    - saturated 6.18
    - monounsaturated 40.801
    - polyunsaturated 21.614
  • Protein 9.17
  • Water 3.52
  • Vitamin A 56 IU
    - beta-carotene 29 μg (0%)
    - lutein and zeaxanthin 17 μg
  • Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.66 mg (57%)
  • Riboflavin (vit. B2) .13 mg (11%)
  • Niacin (vit. B3) 1.167 mg (8%)
  • Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.863 mg (17%)
  • Vitamin B6 0.21 mg (16%)
  • Folate (vit. B9) 22 μg (6%)
  • Vitamin C 1.1 mg (1%)
  • Vitamin E 1.4 mg (9%)
  • Vitamin K 3.5 μg (3%)
  • Calcium 70 mg (7%)
  • Iron 2.53 mg (19%)
  • Magnesium 121 mg (34%)
  • Manganese 4.5 mg (214%)
  • Phosphorus 277 mg (40%)
  • Potassium 410 mg (9%)
  • Sodium 0 mg (0%)
  • Zinc 4.53 mg (48%)

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels.