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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> What is Lox ?

Lox is salmon, typically a filet, that has been cured, and then often it is cold smoked. The cold smoking does not cook the fish, resulting in its characteristic smooth texture similar to the raw product.

Variations on the name are lox (Yiddish), lax (Swedish), laks (Norwegian and Danish) and lachs (German).
Also See: Lox Recipes


It is often served with cream cheese and / or on
bagels.

Types of lox

Regular: Brined in a solution of water, salt, sometimes sugars and spices (the brine). This is called "wet brining". Then the fish may be cold smoked.

Nova or Nova Scotia lox: Similar to regular lox, but cured with a milder brine. The fish is then cold smoked. The name dates from a time when much of the salmon in New York came from Nova Scotia. Today, however, the name refers to the milder brining, as compared to regular lox, and the fish may come from other ocean areas than Nova Scotia, or even be raised on farms.

Scottish lox: A mixture of salt and sometimes sugars, spices and other flavorings are applied directly to the meat of the fish for a period of time. This is called "dry brining" or "Scottish style". The brine mixture is then rinsed off, and the fish is cold smoked.

Scandinavian lox: The fish is salt cured and cold smoked.
Gravad lox: Also known as Gravad lax or Gravlax, this is a traditional Scandinavian means of preparing lox (salmon). Gravad lox is not smoked, but it can be served in a similar fashion. The salmon is coated with a spice mixture, which often includes dill, sugars, and spices like juniper berry. It is then weighted down to force the moisture from the fish and impart the flavorings. It is often served with a sweet mustard-dill sauce.

Sept 2005 - 2014 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels