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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Kosher Fish --> Flounder

Flounder
[Consult your Rabbi on Kosher Issues]

Flounder are flatfish that live in ocean waters in Northern European waters and along the east coast of the United States and Canada. Flounder lie on their left sides on the ocean floor; in adulthood, both eyes are situated on the right, upward-facing side of its body, and are aligned along a roughly 70 angle. Flounder sizes typically vary from five to fifteen inches, though they sometimes grow as long as two feet in length.

Their breadth is about one-half of their length. The flounder feeding ground is the soft mud of the sea bottom, near bridge spiles, docks, and other bottom incumbrances; they are sometimes found on bass grounds as well. Their diet consists of fish spawn, crustaceans, and insects.

Fishing and cooking

Flounder fishing is best in spring and autumn. Flounder may be caught in summer, but the meat will be soft and unpleasant for eating. Flounder will bite at almost anything used for fish bait, including any kind of tackle. Use a small hook; No. 8 being the recommended size. Flounder are an excellent pan fish, but they should be cooked as soon as possible after being caught.

Recipes:

  • Flounders
    (Families Bothidae and Pleuronectidae). Including:
     
  • Flounders (Paralichthys species,
  • Liopsetta species,
  • Platichthys species,etc.);
  • Starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus);
  • Summer flounder or fluke (Paralichthys denatus);
  • Yellowtail flounder (limanda ferrugina);
  • Winter flounder, lemon sole or blackback (Pseudopleuronectes americanus);
  • Halibuts (Hippoglossus species);
  • California halibut (Paralichthys Californicus);
  • Bigmouth sole (Hippoglossina stomata);
  • Butter of scalyfin sole (Isopsetta isolepis);

  • "Dover" sole (Microstomus pacificus);
  • "English" sole (Parophrys vetulus);
  • Fantail sole (Xystreurys liolepis);
  • Petrale sole (Eopsetta jordan);
  • Rex sole (Glyptocephalus zichirus);
  • Rock sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata);
  • Sand Sole (Psettichthys melanostictus);
  • Slender sole (Lyopsetta exillis);
  • Yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera);
  • Pacific turbots (Pleuronichthys species);
  • Curlfin turbot or sole (Pleuronichthys decurrens);
  • Diamond turbot (Hypsopsetta guttulata);
  • Greenland turbot or halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides);
  • Sanddabs (Citharichthys species);
  • Dabs (Limanda species);
  • American plaice (Hippoglossoides platessoides);
  • European plaice (Pleuronectes platessa);
  • Brill (scophthalmus rhomus).
    But not including: European turbot (Scophthalmus maximus or Psetta maximus).
  • Fluke See: Flounders

Sept 2005 - 2014 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods - Kosher Recipes