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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> What is Kishka ?

Kishka is a Slavic word meaning gut, or intestine, that lends its name to varieties of sausage or pudding.

The Eastern European kishka is a blood sausage made with pig's blood and buckwheat or barley, with pig's intestines used as a casing. It is traditionally served at breakfast.

Also see: Kishka Recipes

The Jewish (specifically Ashkenazi) kishke is traditionally made from a kosher beef intestine stuffed with matzo meal, rendered fat (schmaltz) and spices. The cooked kishke can range in color from grey-white to brownish-orange, depending on how much paprika is used. In recent times edible synthetic casings often replace the beef intestines; home cooks also often use kosher poultry neck skin to stand in for the intestines.

Kishka or kishke (Polish: kiszka; Russian: кишка, kishka; Ukrainian: кишка, kyshka)

Sept 2005 - 2014 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels.