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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Kibbeh?

Kibbeh (also kibbee) is a common food in North Africa, the Middle East, and parts of the Caucasus such as Armenia. In its most common form, it consists of minced lamb mixed with bulgur and spices, stuffed inside a bulgur pastry crust and grilled or fried. The shape, size and ingredients vary between different types of kibbeh and between the recipes traditional in different areas. The mix of spices changes as does the composition of the crust. Kibbe can also be from beef Citation needed.

The meat and bulgur mix, without the crust, is often served raw (called kibbeh nayye), similar to steak tartare. This is a popular delicacy in Syria, Lebanon and Palestine, and is often accompanied with arak. In Lebanon, it is common to serve fresh kibbeh meat raw, and then cook the remainder the next day. It is also popular in Brazil, where it is called quibe or kibe, due to the presence of Lebanese immigrants, as other typical dishes, like sfiha (esfiha) and tabouli (tabule).

Sept 2005 - 2014 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels.