Jewish Recipes
Jewish Recipes

Home | Jewish Recipes Main Directory | Submit a Recipe | Kosher Dieting | What Blessing do I make over foods? | About Us
Kosher Grocery Store | Kitchenware | Judaica | Jewish Cookbooks | Food and Health | Search Recipes

Jewish Recipes

  Recipes
Cooking Terms
Foods
Spices
  Cookbooks
Dairy
Meat
  Parve
  Baba Ganoush
  Bagels
  Blintz
  Challah
  Charoset
  Cholent
  Etrog
  Farfel
Falafel
Fish
Gefilte Fish
  Hamantaschen
  Hummus
  Jewish Holidays
  Knish
  Kosher Recipes
  Kosher Wines
  Kugel
  Latkes
  Lox (salmon)
  Matzah
  Pita
  Sufganiya
  Tzimmes

Jewish Cooking

  Judaica
Kitchenware
Kosher Symbols
What is Kosher ?
What is a hechsher?

Page Options

Send

Jewish Recipes: Copyright - Disclaimer

Add us to your favorites

|

Jewish Recipes --> Foods --> Olives --> Kalamata olive

The Kalamata olive is a large, black olive with a smooth, meaty texture named after the city of Kalamata in the southern Peloponnese, Greece. Often used as a table olive, they are usually preserved in wine vinegar or olive oil. Kalamata olives have PDO status in the European Union, meaning that only olives originating from Kalamata can be sold as Kalamata olives.
Description

Kalamata olives are named after the city of Kalamata in Messenia, southern Greece, near where they are grown. They are also grown in nearby Laconia. They are an almond-shaped, plump, dark purple olive, from a tree distinguished from the common olive by the size of its leaves, which grow to twice the size of other olive varieties. The trees are intolerant of cold and are susceptible to Verticillium wilt and resistant to olive knot and the Olive fruit fly.

Kalamata olives cannot be harvested green, and must be hand-picked in order to avoid bruising. Olive oil produced from the Kalamata olive has a faintly grassy flavor. Kalamata olives are protected under the European Protected Geographical Status scheme.
Preparation

There are two methods of preparing Kalamata olives, known as the long and short methods. The short method debitters the olive by packing them in water or weak brine for around a week. Once complete, they are then packed in brine and wine vinegar with a layer of olive oil and slices of lemon on top. The olives can be slit in order to decrease the processing time. The long method involves slitting the olives and placing them in salted water in order to debitter them, a process that can take as long as three months. Levels of polyphenol remain in the olives after processing, giving them their slightly bitter taste.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods