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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Jewish and Israeli Salads

Jewish And Israeli Salads

Israeli salad (Hebrew: סָלָט יְרָקוֹת יִשְׂרְאֵלִי‎, salat yerakot yisraeli, "Israeli vegetable salad") is a chopped salad of finely diced tomato and cucumber. "Distinguished by the tiny diced tomatoes and cucumbers," it is described as the "most well-known national dish of Israel."

In Israel, it is also commonly referred to as salat yerakot (Hebrew: סָלָט יְרָקוֹת‎, "vegetable salad"), salat katzutz (Hebrew: סָלָט קָצוּץ‎, "chopped salad")[4] or salat aravi (Hebrew: סָלָט עֲרָבִי‎, "Arab salad").

 

Israeli salad is usually dressed with fresh lemon juice and olive oil. Parsley and spring onions are sometimes added, but not lettuce.[6] Generally, the cucumbers are not peeled. The key is using very fresh vegetables and chopping them as finely as possible.[7] The ability to chop the tomatoes and cucumbers into the "finest, most perfect dice" is considered a mark of status among many kibbutz cooks.

Israeli salad is served as an independent side dish, as an accompaniment to main dishes, or stuffed in a pita with falafel or shawarma. It was part of the traditional Israeli breakfast at home before Western-style breakfast cereals became popular, and remains a standard feature at buffet breakfasts at Israeli hotels.

History

The dish cannot be an ancient one since the tomato was introduced to cultivation in the Middle East by John Barker, British consul in Aleppo c. 1799 c. 1825. Nineteenth century descriptions of tomato consumption are uniformly as a part of a cooked dish. In 1881 the tomato is described as only eaten in the region, "within the last forty years."

Israeli foods like hummus, falafel and Israeli salad are common to much of the Mediterranean and Arabic world." Gil Hovav, an Israeli food editor, says hummus and falafel are Arabic, and that Israeli salad is, "an Arab salad, Palestinian salad."[13] Joseph Massad, a Palestinian professor of Arab Politics at Columbia University, cites the renaming of, "Palestinian rural salad (now known in New York delis as Israeli salad)," as one example of the appropriation of Palestinian and pan-Syrian foods by Zionists.

Other similar chopped salads found in the Middle East, include the Persian salad shirazi سالاد شيرازي (which includes mint, diced onions, and peeled cucumbers), and the Turkish choban salad; among others found throughout the eastern Mediterranean area in Turkey, Lebanon, and even Egypt.

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Sept 2005 - 2014 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels.