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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Kosher Cheese -->  Simple Truth Organic Ricotta Cheese
Simple Truth Organic Ricotta Cheese

Kosher -- OU Dairy

Recipes

Nutrition Facts Simple Truth Organic Ricotta Cheese
  • Serving Size 1/4 cup (62g)
Amount/Serving %DV
  • Calories 90
  • Total fat 6 g 9%
  • Sat. Fat 4 g 20%
  • Trans Fat 0g
  • Cholesterol 25 mg 9%
  • Sodium 5mg 3%
  • Total Carb. 3 g 1%
  • Fiber 0g
  • Sugars 3g
  • Protein 7g
  • Vitamin A 6%
  • Vitamin C 0%
  • Calcium 15%
  • Iron 0%

Ricotta (Italian pronunciation: is an Italian whey cheese made from sheep (or cow, goat, or Italian buffalo) milk whey left over from the production of cheese.

Like other whey cheeses, it is made by coagulating the proteins that remain after the casein has been used to make cheese, notably albumin and globulin. Thus, ricotta can be eaten by persons with casein intolerance.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ricotta (literally meaning "recooked") uses whey, the liquid that remains after straining curds when making cheese. Most of the milk protein (especially casein) is removed when cheese is made, but some protein remains in the whey, mostly albumin. This remaining protein can be harvested if the whey is first allowed to become more acidic by additional fermentation (by letting it sit for 12–24 hours at room temperature). Then the acidified whey is heated to near boiling. The combination of low pH and high temperature denatures the protein and causes it to precipitate out, forming a fine curd. Once cooled, the curd is separated by passing through a fine cloth.

Ricotta curds are creamy white in appearance, slightly sweet in taste, and contain around 13% fat. In this form, it is somewhat similar in texture to some cottage cheese variants, though considerably lighter. It is highly perishable. Ricotta comes in other forms as well, see variants below.

Variants

Smoked ricotta from the Sila (Calabria, Italy)

While Italian ricotta is typically made from the whey of sheep, cow, goat, or water buffalo milk, the American product is almost always made of cow's milk whey. While both types are low in fat and sodium, the Italian version is naturally sweet, while the American is a little saltier and more moist.

In addition to its fresh, soft form, ricotta is also sold in three preparations which ensure a longer shelf life: salted, baked and smoked. The pressed, salted, dried, and aged variety of the cheese is known as ricotta salata, is milky-white and firm, and used for grating or shaving. Ricotta salata is sold in wheels, decorated by a delicate basket-weave pattern.

Ricotta infornata is produced by placing a large lump of soft ricotta in the oven until it develops a brown, lightly charred crust, sometimes even until it becomes sandy brown all the way through. Ricotta infornata is popular primarily in Sardinia and Sicily, and is sometimes called ricotta al forno.

Ricotta affumicata is similar to ricotta infornata. It is produced by placing a lump of soft ricotta in a smoker until it develops a grey crust and acquires a charred wood scent, usually of oak or chestnut wood, although, in Friuli, beech wood is used, with the addition of juniper and herbs.

Ricotta scanta is produced by the process of letting the ricotta go sour in a controlled manner, for about a week, then stirring it every 2–3 days, salting occasionally and allowing the liquid to flow away. After about 100 days, the ricotta has the consistency of cream cheese, with a distinct, pungent, piquant aroma, much like blue cheese but much richer. Ricotta scanta, also called ricotta forte, tastes as it smells, extremely aromatic and piquant, with a definite bitter note. Tasted with the tip of the tongue, it has a "hot" sensation.

In Spanish, ricotta is known as requesón. It can be salted or sweetened for cooking purposes. It was brought to Mexico by the Spaniards and is sometimes used as filling for tlacoyos and tacos dorados and in the central west area (Jalisco, Michoacán and Colima), it is spread over tostadas or bolillos, or served as a side to beans. Though not as commonly used as the queso fresco. In Portugal and Brazil, a smilar product is called requeijão.

Romanian urdă (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈurdə]), and Macedonian "urda" (урда) is made by reprocessing the whey drained from any type of cheese. Urdă is thus similar to fresh ricotta as its fabrication implies the same technological process.[4][5] However, Romanian urdă is neither smoked, nor baked in the oven like some variants of the Italian ricotta. Besides, urdă is used mainly in desserts, not in other types of dishes. Urdă has been produced by Romanian shepherds since time immemorial and is consequently regarded by Romanians as a Romanian traditional product.

Indian khoa is often confused with ricotta, but the two are very different. It is lower in moisture and made from whole milk instead of whey.

Albanian gjiza is made by boiling whey for about 15 minutes. The derivate is drained 3 to 4 times with a napkin or piece of cloth and salted to taste. Gjiza can be served immediately or refrigerated for a couple of days.

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels.