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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Kosher Cheese --> Cream Cheese

Philadelphia Cream Cheese Kosher OU D Kroger Cream Cheese Kosher OU D

Nutrition Facts
  • Serving Size 1 oz (28 g)
  • Calories 100
  • Calories from fat 81

Amount/Serving %DV

  • Total Fat 9.0g 14%
  • Saturated Fat 6g 30%
  • Trans Fat 0g
  • Cholesterol 35 mg 12%
  • Sodium 105mg 4%
  • Total Carbohydrates 1g 0%
  • Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
  • Sugars 1g
  • Protein 2g
  • Vitamin A 6%
  • Vitamin C 0%
  • Calcium 2%
  • Iron 0%
Nutrition Facts
  • Serving size: 2 Tbsp (30g)
  • Calories 100
  • Calories from fat 90

Amount/Serving %DV

  • Total Fat 10g 15%
  • Saturated Fat 6g 30%
  • Trans Fat 0g
  • Cholesterol 30 mg 10%
  • Sodium 100mg 4%
  • Total Carbohydrates 2g 1%
  • Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
  • Sugars 2g
  • Protein 2g
  • Vitamin A 8%
  • Vitamin C 0%
  • Calcium 2%
  • Iron 0%

Cream cheese is a soft, mild-tasting cheese with a high fat content. Traditionally, it is made from unskimmed milk enriched with additional cream. Stabilizers such as carob bean gum and carrageenan are added.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines the dairy product as containing at least 33% milk fat (as marketed) with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9. In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content.

Cream cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, and so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie and Neufchâtel. It is more comparable in taste, texture and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone.

United States

Recipes for the making of cream cheese can be found in American cookbooks and newspapers beginning in the mid-eighteenth century. By the second decade of the 19th century, Philadelphia and its environs had gained a reputation for this cheese. The cheese, however, was produced on family farms and so quantities for distribution were small. Around 1873, William A. Lawrence, a Chester, NY, dairyman, was the first to mass-produce cream cheese. In 1873 he purchased a Neufchatel factory and shortly thereafter, by adding cream to the process, was able to create a richer cheese, that he called “cream cheese”. In 1877 he created the first brand for cream cheese: the silhouette of a cow followed by the words: Neufchatel & Cream Cheese. In 1879, in order to create a larger factory, Lawrence partnered with a Chester merchant, Samuel S Durland. In 1880, Alvah L Reynolds, a New York cheese distributor, began to sell the cheese of Lawrence & Durland and created a brand name for it: Philadelphia Cream Cheese. Reynolds chose the name based on the reputation Philadelphia had for such cheese. By the end of 1880, faced with increasing demand for his Philadelphia brand, Reynolds turned to Charles Green, a second Chester dairyman, who, by 1880, had been manufacturing cream cheese. Some of Green’s cheese was, now, also sold under the Philadelphia label. In 1892, Reynolds bought the Empire Cheese Co. of South Edmeston, NY to produce cheese under his Philadelphia label. When that burned down in 1900, he turned, the following year, to the newly-formed Phenix Cheese Co. to produce his cheese. In 1903, Reynolds sold the rights to his Philadelphia brand to Phenix (which merged with Kraft in 1928).[12] By the early 1880s, in addition to Philadelphia brand, was Star, a second cream cheese brand of Lawrence & Durland, and Green’s World and Globe brands. At the turn of the 19th century, New York dairymen were producing cream cheese for a number of other brands: Double Cream (C. Percival); Eagle (F.X. Baumert); Empire (Phenix Cheese Co.); Mohican (International Cheese Co.); Monroe Cheese Co. (Gross & Hoffman); and Nabob (F.H. Legget).

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels.