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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Kosher Cheese --> Blue Cheese and Gorgonzola Cheese

Gorgonzola is a veined Italian blue cheese, made from unskimmed cow's milk. It can be buttery or firm, crumbly and quite salty, with a "bite" from its blue veining.

Blue cheese is a general classification of cow's milk, sheep's milk, or goat's milk cheeses that have had cultures of the mold Penicillium added so that the final product is spotted or veined throughout with blue, blue-gray or blue-green mold, and carries a distinct smell, either from that or various specially cultivated bacteria. Some blue cheeses are injected with spores before the curds form and others have spores mixed in with the curds after they form. Blue cheeses are typically aged in a temperature-controlled environment such as a cave. Blue cheese can be eaten by itself or can be crumbled or melted into or over foods.

In the European Union, many blue cheeses such as Roquefort, Gorgonzola and Blue Stilton carry a protected designation of origin, meaning they can bear the name only if they have been made in a particular region in a certain country. Similarly, individual countries have protections of their own such as France's Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée and Italy's Denominazione di Origine Protetta. Blue cheeses with no protected origin name are designated simply "blue cheese".

The characteristic flavor of blue cheeses tends to be sharp and salty. The smell of this food is due both to the mold and to types of bacteria encouraged to grow on the cheese: for example, the bacterium Brevibacterium linens is responsible for the smell of many blue cheeses, as well as foot odor and other human body odors.

Blue

So-called blue cheese is created by inoculating a cheese with Penicillium roqueforti or Penicillium glaucum. This is done while the cheese is still in the form of loosely pressed curds, and may be further enhanced by piercing a ripening block of cheese with skewers in an atmosphere in which the mold is prevalent. The mold grows within the cheese as it ages. These cheeses have distinct blue veins, which gives them their name and, often, assertive flavors. The moulds range from pale green to dark blue, and may be accompanied by white and crusty brown molds. Their texture can be soft or firm. Some of the most renowned cheeses are of this type, each with its own distinctive color, flavor, texture and aroma. They include Roquefort, Gorgonzola, and Stilton.


Danish Blue Cheese

Danish Blue – sharp, salty, and creamy blue-veined cheese. All natural. Crumble over salads, use as a table cheese, or spread on crackers. Pairs well with Cabernet Sauvignon. 5-7 oz. wedge.

Kosher for Passover


Blue Wedge

Handcrafted, “60 Days Aged” blue. Use as a topping on salads, in dressings and on gourmet cheese platters. Made along with 3rd generation Wisconsin Cheese makers. OU-D kosher
(6-8 oz. random weights)


Crumbled Blue

Handcrafted, “60 Days Aged” blue. Use as a topping on salads, in dressings and on gourmet cheese platters. Made along with 3rd generation Wisconsin Cheese makers. OU-D kosher

(4 oz.)

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods