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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Beans --> Green Beans

Green beans, also known as French beans, Fine beans (British English), string beans in the northeastern and western United States, or ejotes in Mexico, are the unripe fruit of specific cultivated varieties of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

Green bean varieties have been bred especially for the fleshiness, flavor, or sweetness of their pods. Haricots verts, French for "green beans", may refer to a longer, thinner type of green bean than the typical American green bean.

The first "stringless" bean was bred in 1894 by Calvin Keeney, called the "father of the stringless bean", while working in Le Roy, New York.

Recipes

Culinary use

Green beans are of nearly universal distribution. They are marketed canned, frozen, and fresh. Green beans are often steamed, boiled, stir-fried, or baked in casseroles. A dish with green beans popular throughout the United States, particularly at Thanksgiving, is green bean casserole, which consists of green beans, cream of mushroom soup, and French fried onions.

Some restaurants in the USA serve green beans that are battered and fried, and Japanese restaurants in the United States frequently serve green bean tempura. Green beans are also sold dried and fried with vegetables such as carrots, corn, and peas.

Beans contain high concentrations of lectins and may be harmful if consumed in excess in uncooked or improperly cooked form.

The flavonol miquelianin (Quercetin 3-O-glucuronide) can be found in green beans.

Bush types

  • Bountiful, 50 days (green, heirloom)
  • Burpee's Stringless Green Pod, 50 days (green, heirloom)
  • Contender, 50 days (green)
  • Topcrop, 51 days (green), 1950 AAS winner
  • Red Swan, 55 days (red)
  • Blue Lake 274, 58 days (green)
  • Maxibel, 59 days (green fillet)
  • Roma II, 59 days (green romano)
  • Improved Commodore / Bush Kentucky Wonder, 60 days (green), 1945 AAS winner
  • Dragon's Tongue, 60 days (streaked)
  • Jade / Jade II, 65 days (green)

Pole types

  • Blue Lake, 60 days (green)
  • Fortex, 60 days (green fillet)
  • Kentucky Blue, 63 days (green), 1991 AAS winner
  • Old Homestead / Kentucky Wonder, 65 days (green, heirloom)
  • Rattlesnake, 72 days (streaked, heirloom)
  • Purple King, 75 days (purple)

Beans, snap, green, raw Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

  • Energy 131 kJ (31 kcal)
  • Carbohydrates 6.97 g
    - Dietary fiber 2.7 g
  • Fat 0.22 g
  • Protein 1.83 g
  • Vitamin A equiv. 35 μg (4%)
  • Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.082 mg (7%)
  • Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.104 mg (9%)
  • Niacin (vit. B3) 0.734 mg (5%)
  • Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.225 mg (5%)
  • Vitamin B6 0.141 mg (11%)
  • Folate (vit. B9) 33 μg (8%)
  • Vitamin C 12.2 mg (15%)
  • Vitamin K 14.4 μg (14%)
  • Calcium 37 mg (4%)
  • Iron 1.03 mg (8%)
  • Magnesium 25 mg (7%)
  • Manganese 0.216 mg (10%)
  • Phosphorus 38 mg (5%)
  • Potassium 211 mg (4%)
  • Zinc 0.24 mg (3%)
  • Fluoride 19 g

Link to USDA Database entry Percentages are roughly approximated from US recommendations for adults. Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bialy.