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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Beans --> Black-eye Peas

The black-eyed pea or black-eyed bean, a legume, is a subspecies of the cowpea, grown around the world for its medium-sized, edible bean. The bean mutates easily, giving rise to a number of varieties. The common commercial one is called the California Blackeye; it is pale-colored with a prominent black spot. The currently accepted botanical name is Vigna unguiculata subsp. unguiculata, although previously it was classified in the genus Phaseolus. Vigna unguiculata subsp. dekindtiana is the wild relative and Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis is the related asparagus bean. Other beans of somewhat similar appearance, such as the frijol ojo de cabra (goat's eye bean) of northern Mexico, are sometimes incorrectly called black-eyed peas, and vice versa.

The "good luck" traditions of eating black-eyed peas at Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, are recorded in the Babylonian Talmud (compiled circa 500 CE), Horayot 12A: "Abaye [d. 339 CE] said, now that you have established that good-luck symbols avail, you should make it a habit to see qara (bottle gourd), rubiya (black-eyed peas, Arabic lubiya), kartei (leeks), silka (either beets or spinach), and tamrei (dates) on your table on the New Year." However, the custom may have resulted from an early mistranslation of the Aramaic word rubiya (fenugreek).

Recipes

Black-eye peas Beans

  • Lubiya: Black-eyed peas and fenugreek are stewed with vealin a dish called Lubiya. The recipe for Lubiya recipe is adapted from Gilda Angelís Sephardic Holiday Cooking.

Mature black-eyed peas
cooked, no salt
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

  • Energy 484 kJ (116 kcal)
    Carbohydrates 20.76 g
    - Sugars 3.3 g
    - Dietary fiber 6.5 g
  • Fat 0.53 g
  • Protein 7.73 g
  • Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.202 mg (18%)
  • Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.055 mg (5%)
  • Niacin (vit. B3) 0.495 mg (3%)
  • Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.411 mg (8%)
  • Vitamin B6 0.1 mg (8%)
  • Folate (vit. B9) 208 μg (52%)
  • Vitamin E 0.28 mg (2%)
  • Vitamin K 1.7 μg (2%)
  • Calcium 24 mg (2%)
  • Iron 2.51 mg (19%)
  • Magnesium 53 mg (15%)
  • Manganese 0.475 mg (23%)
  • Phosphorus 156 mg (22%)
  • Potassium 278 mg (6%)
    Sodium 4 mg (0%)
  • Zinc 1.29 mg (14%)

USDA Database entry Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Sept 2005 - 2013 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods- Jewish Foods
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bialy.