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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish Cookbooks --> Baking

Qty:

14.99
Baking 9-1-1

Rescue from Recipe Disasters;
Answers to Your Most Frequently Asked Baking Questions;
40 Recipes for Every Baker (Paperback)
by Sarah Phillips (Author)
"THE BAKER MUST WORK
within the parameters of a recipe to produce
a baked good that will rise, set,
and taste the way he or..."

This is not a Jewish or Kosher Recipes cookbook, but has a lot good information on baking.....

Baking is a science. But who wants to spend hours in the kitchen experimenting?  Thankfully, Sarah Phillips does. She has discovered what causes baking disasters and show bakers at all levels of expertise how to avoid them.

 


Jewish Recipes

Kosher Recipes

Baking 9-1-1 

Baking is the technique of prolonged cooking of food by dry heat acting by conduction, and not by radiation, normally in an oven, but also in hot ashes, or on hot stones. It is primarily used for the preparation of bread, cakes, pastries and pies, tarts, and quiches. Such items are sometimes referred to as "baked goods," and are sold at a bakery. A person who prepares baked goods as a profession is called a baker. It is also used for the preparation of baked potatoes; baked apples; baked beans; some pasta dishes, such as lasagne; and various other foods, such as the pretzel.

Many domestic ovens are provided with two heating elements: one for baking, using convection and conduction to heat the food; and one for broiling or grilling, heating mainly by radiation. Meat may be baked, but is more often roasted, a similar process, using higher temperatures and shorter cooking times.

Items other than foodstuffs can be baked, such as things made of clay and Creepy Crawlers. The baking process does not add any fat to the product, and producers of snack products such as potato chips are also beginning to substitute the process of deep-frying by baking in order to reduce the fat content of their products.

Sept 2005 - 2014 - Kosher Recipes - Kosher Cooking - Jewish Cooking - Jewish Recipes - Jewish Foods